Tactical Tips – Point Shooting

Sup Y’all gun geeks,

We’re gonna be reviewing Point Shooting. I really think more people should be training using this method for short distance CQC(Close Quarters Combat) then training looking down the barrel using the sights. When push comes to shove your adrenaline will be pumping and your mind will be racing so fast that you will not have the time or wherewithal to even think about using your sights, you will just start blasting away and missing every time. Even our trained LE have that same problem, but now most departments are starting to train with Point Shooting or Flash Shooting. These tactics are used by most of the top shooters in the world such as Delta Force, SEAL Team Six, SAS 22. It takes a lot of practice to get good at or even sufficient. You will need to be at the range day after day putting hundreds if not thousands of rounds down range, but in the end it will be all worth it when it comes time to protect your loved ones.

Recent science says that we lose our near vision and our fine motor skills when our fight or flight response is activated, when sight shooting both of these skills are needed to properly sight shoot. When you are in the fight or flight response you will only be able to do what your muscles have been trained to do. Studies say that most handgun fights are fought within 5-8 yards which doesn’t give you much time to react if you are being charged at or if someone else draws a weapon. Point shooting is a method of shooting a firearm that relies on a shooters instinctive reactions in a life threatening situation to quickly engage close range targets. The method is used in close quarters fighting do to lack of time to react, or you have low light conditions which hinder your ability to use your sights. When practicing point shooting it is very important to have the correct handgun for you, it must feel like an extension of your arm and hand. Do not switch guns when practicing cause the slightest difference in your gun can change the way you point shoot. The weight of the gun, the handle of the gun, the caliber and recoil can all throw off the mechanics that you are teaching your body to use in emergency situations to protect yourself and loved ones.

Now we will go over some techniques to use when point shooting, since to be effective at it you will need to practice a lot. Just like anything else that takes skill, such as basketball, football, baseball. These all take lots of practice to be good at and so does point shooting.

  1. Position yourself 3 yards away from a large(10 inch) target. In an athletic stance where you are on the balls of your feet, execute a tactical quickdraw(covered in previous post) to a firing position and fire multiple rounds into the target. I recommend to fire anywhere between 3-6 shots. DO NOT USE YOUR SIGHTS!!! The point of the drill is to get you used to not using the sights. It may take a while but you will learn to hit center mass of your target every time. One key is to try to do it as quickly as possible, but try to take just enough time to allow the momentum of your arms and gun to slow right before you pull the trigger. I like to call it controlled chaos, I teach it to my 10-year-old basketball team when doing lay up drills. Practice this drill till all your shots are in a grouping of a couple of inches. Grouping is very important, it doesn’t matter if you hit the target every time, if they are all over the place it is not effective. You want your hits in a small group near center mass. Once you have good groups at 3 yards on a 10 inch target move it back a few yards and use a small target and keep going till you reach no further then 8 yards and your target is no bigger then a standard picnic plate.
  2. After you feel you have a good grasp on step one you can start practicing with multiple targets. Try setting up 3 or more targets a couple of yards apart, some closer and some further away but all no further than a 5-8 yards down range. Now execute a tactical quickdraw and go down the line, one shot per target. Once you feel comfortable with this drill and you are hitting center mass change it up. Keep targets in the same spots but put a burst of 2-3 rounds in each. Try them in different order, or have a friend tell you which one to shoot (“one!” “two!” “three, one, two!”), the key thing is to make sure that you can hit your target center mass every time, once you can do this try to accelerate your pace. But remember to always make sure that you are in control and do not try to do more than your skill set allows. To get to this stage will probably take weeks to months of shooting hundreds of rounds every day or multiple times a week.
  3. Once you have mastered step two, try shooting while moving. While moving you should still be able to hit targets at 5 yards. Set up three or more targets a few yards apart. Start about 15-20 yards back and sprint towards your targets, once you are within 5-8 yards of your target tactically quickdraw your gun before you come to a complete stop. Fire a two shot burst, side step to engage the second target and fire a two shot burst, then so on. Each time you run through course, try to do it faster; try not to pause when shooting.

Tips to make you a better:

  1. Accuracy and speed can be improved by a methodical and well executed draw, read my post on Tactical Quickdraw, it should help you understand how to execute properly.
  2. PS abilities vary greatly between people. Dexterity and hand eye coordination are a big component, and some people just are naturally inclined in those two areas. Don’t worry about starting off close to your target, everybody is different it might take you a little longer to figure it out buy with enough practice you will master it. Don’t worry about looking uncool if the target is only a few yards away, it will look a lot more uncool if you are shooting at a target 8 yards away but are missing time after time.
  3. Point shooting is much less efficient at greater distances, this is why I’m saying to shoot no further than 5-8 yards. I will be covering Flash Sighting which you will want to use for greater distances, it only takes a tenth of a second longer but you will land hits about four times as much.
  4. I recommend using a low caliber handgun when starting out. Either a .22 or a 9mm will be best because it has less recoil which will help with grouping and shooting multiple rounds quickly.
  5. Remember SAFETY FIRST ALWAYS. These exercises should only be done by people who are comfortable with handguns. If you are new then you should take some gun safety classes at  your local gun range and practice shooting for a few months to get comfortable. Most of these exercises you will not be able to do in your local gun range for safety reasons so you will need to find an area that always shooting and has lots of wide open space. Make sure to know the state and local gun laws before shooting.
  6. Be sure to know what’s beyond your targets, bullets can travel very far distances.
  7. A great way to practice Tactical Quickdrawing the weapon and shooting motion is to practice with snap-caps, you can buy them at your local gun dealer for under $20.00.

Thanks for reading and I hope you practice this shooting technique cause it will save your life when you are in a life threatening situation. Remember though that this is not a novice technique and you need to practice a lot. This is an expert shooting technique and it takes days, weeks, if not months of practice and hundreds if not thousands of rounds down range before you are consistently hitting center mass with good grouping.

Again thank you for reading and be safe always use gun safety rules when handling a gun.

nwtactical

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Tactical Tips – How to be Combat Ready with a Handgun Part II

1911

Welcome back to nwtactical blog,

We will be picking right up where we left off, we finished with the most popular rounds and now we are going to move onto how to practice reloading your pistol.

When practicing reloading your pistol you should be practice with at least two different pistols. One primary and one secondary. If you practice enough you will not have to think about the process it will come natural to you, you will build muscle memory. So instead of thinking is the slide locked? -> press magazine release -> magazine is clear -> grab new magazine -> insert new magazine with correct orientation -> release slide. Those are the steps you take to reload a magazine. It may seem like a lot when put on paper but if you practice it will become second nature. The reason you need to practice is so when you are in a life threatening situation you don’t have to think about reloading your pistol you will do it and you will be able to focus on the situation at hand instead.

  1. You should be able to load your handgun rapidly, and flawlessly 100% of the time – w/o looking at your hands, your pistol, or your magazines.
  2. Pistol Reload

    An Emergency reload is when you have fired all the rounds in the current magazine and your slide is in the locked back position. You should be able to reload your magazine while your gun is still pointed at the target. Psychologically, lowering your gun gives the perp an advantage over you and keeps you focused on your gun and not on the perp who is trying to hurt you and your loved ones. The technique you want to use is: when the slide locks back, you want to remove a magazine from your magazine belt clip. As you move the fresh magazine to the gun, eject the current empty magazine letting it fall to the floor. Align the magazine against the magazine well and slam the magazine home with some force, seat the magazine using the palm of your hand; then push the slide release and allow the slide to slam forward. This is not a gentle process, it should be fast, loud, and aggressive. You should also enjoy the primal feeling that you get when doing this procedure.
    tactical reload

  3. A Tactical reload is when there is a pause in the gun fight and you have the opportunity to duck behind cover. Currently your magazine still has some rounds in it but you know you are running low, this is when you should reload so when you resume the firefight you will have a full magazine to work with. Now this drill is a little different then an emergency reload. What you will want to do is: From behind cover reach into your mag pouch/holder and grab the mag with your thumb, pointer, and middle finger. Move the mag back to the gun while you eject the partially spent mag into your hand, catch the ejected mag with your ring finger, pinkie, and the palm of your hand (in the emergency reload you let your empty mag hit the floor but since there are still rounds in this mag you will want to catch it and save it for later). After catching the partially used mag, insert the mag with your fingers and give it a little tug to make sure it is seated properly (since you have your partially used mag in your hand you can not slam it home like before). Since you didn’t run out of ammo you don’t have to manipulate the slide and you should have a round already loaded as well so do not cock the gun or you will eject a perfectly good round.

Gun Malfunction
This section we will be going over Malfunctions, unfortunately with semi-automatic handguns you will eventually have a malfunction no matter how well made the gun is. It might take 50,000 rounds but you will experience one and its good to know how to fix a malfunction. 

  1. Type-1 malfunction: This is a failure-to-fire (FTF) malfunction. When you pull the trigger and you hear a “click” instead of a “Ka-Boom” then you know there is something wrong. This is the simplest type of malfunction, and the easiest to fix: just tap, rack/filp and viola its fixed.
  2. Type-2 malfunction: Is a failure-to-eject is a common problem on older 1911s and other guns with shorter ejectors. This type of malfunction is affectionately known as a “stove pipe.” The symptom of this malfunction is a “dead trigger”, and there will probably be a brass casing poking out of the ejection port but not always, and the slide is not all the way forward. To fix it do the same method as Type-1: Tap, Rack/Flip.
  3. Type-3 Malfuntions: This is known as “The Mother of All Malfunctions” (MOAM) by some. This is a feed-way stoppage, which means that too much brass is in the chamber at the same time. If you do get a type-3 malfunction under fire, may instructors will tell you to grab your back up but sometimes that is not an option. First thing you will want to do is find cover before executing. To Clear: Grab your slide and lock it back. Press the mag eject, and grab the magazine and toss it to the ground. Grab the slide and rack it hard 3 times in a row. Then reach for a brand new mag and slam it home and rack a new round into the chamber. Some pistols, notably glocks, may be cleared of a type-3 malfunction simply by dropping the mag far enough to allow the slide to go forward and then re-seating the mag with authority, slam the damn thing home hard!!! If the slide goes completely forward then the gun is ready to fire, if it does not go all the way forward then perform Type-1 clearing action.
  4. Type-4 malfunction: Type-4 malfunction is very uncommon, and if it ever happens to you when you are practicing with your gun at the range, throw the fucking gun away and get a new one. Just kidding don’t be rude but you do have a serious problem that is a manufacturing fault. THis malfunction is when the slide does not go back into battery after firing. This might happen because your guide rod or guide rails are really gummed up (to the point where it looks as if there is a wad of chewed up gum in it), your guide spring is too weak or your chamber design is bad. This should never happen in a modern semi-automatic pistol. What I recommend is to either send the gun back to the manufacture to have their professional gunsmiths look at it and fix it or take it to a local gunsmith you know and trust.

Today we went over some more of the technical aspects of how to be combat ready but they are just as important. Next we will be going over how to “Point Shoot and Flash Sighting”. It should be fun so stay tuned and make sure you click on the follow button so stay up to date on the blog. 

Thank you for following.

Tactical Tip – Tactical Shooting Positions

What’s Up Y’all,

We are gonna flip the script on you and instead of giving you a survival tip and will be giving you a Tactical Tip, after all this is called NW Tactical. Today we will be going over different shooting positions.

First and foremost is the Ready Positions there are three different type of Ready Positions, all three of these Ready Positions allows you to have one hand off the gun so you can perform seperate tasks, but you are still ready to fire when nessacary.

The first Ready Position is Low and Ready. This is the most common position for tactical shooting. Low and Ready is the best position when you are searching for a target or approaching a target area at a fast rate. This position also is the fastest to move from to a shooting position.

high-ready

High Ready is one of the least common ready positions but something worth knowing, the reason for this is because at most shooting ranges it is against the rules to point your gun straight up in the air because of accidental discharge. No one wants bullets raining down on them. However when in a tactical situation and you are moving around a large group of people it is the safest way to hold your gun. It is also easier to perform tasks with the support hand while holding the gun in a High Ready position, such as reloading, or pulling and tossing a grenade/flashbang to clear a room.

Sling Ready

The last ready position is Sling Ready or in other terms Patrol Ready. You always hear that that you should always be in a low ready position but unfortunately it is just not practical. Sling Ready is the most comfortable position for long term patrols with a rifle like an M16A2 or M4A1. WIth the Sling Ready position you can relax both your arms against your body to prevent fatigue, you can also let go of the weapon to perform two handed tasks while the rifle remains in the Low Ready position so you can move to a firing position quickly.

Next Position group we will cover is the Standing Positions. These positions you are most likely to use while on the move, you first will lay down cover fire and then move to the nearest cover available. There are three standing positions as well.

off hand shooting stance

First standing position is the Traditional Offhand Position. The body is canted towards the target. The firing arm is cocked, and the support arm is directly under the barrel, and the feet are placed firmly at a 90 degree angle. The offhand is good for unsupported accuracy at medium ranges but is slow to get into and out of position. It is also not good for rapid fire because you can not absorb recoil very well. Also the firing arm is very exposed and has a greater chance of banging into walls or door jams when clearing rooms or clearing alleys.

DOD-ModifiedOffhand

Next is the Modified Offhand Position. The body is also canted as to present the smallest target possible to the enemy. In this position you should be bent slightly forward at the hips and both your elbows are dropped towards the ground, this makes it easier to absorb recoil during rapid fire, it also makes it so you do not bump into walls and door jams while clearing rooms. Your feet should be a little wider then your shoulders at a more natural stance so you can move forward and backwards easily and you can also turn your body 180 degrees.

UFP

Last we have the Universal Fighting Position. This position is the most commonly used especially among our elite warriors such as delta force, Navy SEALS and SWAT Teams. In this position both of your feet are pointed directly at the target and your arms are drawn inward. The one down side is that it presents your chest to the target but today’s warriors wear highly effective body armor which makes this position more practical. The shooter should grip the magazine with the support arm or have a pistol grip. Thisis an advanced position and should not be used by novices.

THe next set of positions will be the Low Positions. These should be used when taking cover.

SFP

First is the Squatting Position. Your feet are completely flat on the ground and you are slightly leaning forward. One thing to remember is to not rest your elbows on your knees this will make you very unstable when trying to absorb recoil, remember the saying meat to bone not bone to bone. This position is the most stable, it is much better then any standing position and can be easy to get in and out of.

DSP

The Kneeling shooting position. One foot should be flat on the ground and one knee resting on the ground. Do not sit on your foot cause this will make it hard to move if nessacary. This position is also easy to get in and out of, and remember you should not rest your elbow on your knee but rest your tricep on your knee. Remember the saying meat to bone not bone to bone, just like the squatting position.

SFP

Another Low Position is the sitting position. This is similar to the previous one. You do not want to rest your elbows on your knees, meat to bone. This is the hardest position to get in and and out of, and that is why I do not recommend to use it.

PSP

One of the most stable low positions is the Prone Position. One advantage of the prone position is that you offer the enemy a very small target, the down side is its hard to get in and out of especially when fully kited up. One way to get out of the prone position is to do a prone roll which makes it harder for the enemy to engage.

SSP

Next we will cover Using Support while shooting. Using support should always be a last resort option, mainly because if you are using support then you are most likely exposed. One reason to use support is if you are firing long range and the enemy can not engage you at the distance. Snipers use support all the time and effectively because they are trained to do so.

Lastly we will cover three standing Pistol Shooting Positions. The positions can also be used while kneeling.

Isosceles

Isosceles is when your feet are together and pointed at the target, your body square to the target, both arms fully extended, and with firing hand pushing forward and support hand pulling back slightly this should help you absorb the recoil better. Similar to the UFP above this is a very good position if you are wearing body armor.

Weaver

The Weaver is when the feet are spread about shoulder width and at about 45 degree angle. Both arms fully bent, body canted with respect to target. Firing hand pushing forward and support hand pulling back slightly to absorb recoil.

MWP

Lastly we have the Modified Weaver with your feet spread shoulder width apart and at a somewhat less than 45 degree angle. Firing arm should be mostly straight and support arm bent to help absorb recoil. Most of the arm positions are the way they are to help absorb recoil which is very important so you can shoot rapidly and maintain consistant grouping.

I am sorry that this post is so long but there are a lot of different positions and they are all important to know, you do not have to execute all these positions perfectly but it is good to know what they are and how to utilize them.

Once again thank you all for joining me here and please leave any questions or comments. Also don’t forget to click on the follow button so you don’t miss out on all my new blog posts.

Springfield XD(M) .40S&W

Springfield1

Hi,

Welcome back to NW Tactical, today we are gonna switch gears hear a little bit and instead of reviewing a knife we will review our first gun. This one is my personal favorite polymer pistol on the market. The Springfield XD(m) .40S&W, this pistol not only looks badass but I think its one of the best polymer pistols on the market at this time because of its innovation in egronomics and safety.

First off let me clear up one common question, why is the round called .40S&W, when it is manufactured by Springfield. The .40S&W round was created jointly by Smith & Wesson and Winchester Repeating Arms Company. The .40 S&W was developed from the ground up as a law enforcement cartridge designed to duplicate the performance of the F.B.I. reduced-velocity 10mm Auto cartridge, which could be retrofitted into medium-frame (9mm size) automatic handguns. The reason the F.B.I. needed this type of round is because it needed a handgun that could hold more rounds then your typical 6 shooter revolver and had more stopping power then the 9mm parabellum round. The reason they came to this conclusion is because in the aftermath of the 1986 F.B.I. Miami shootout during which 2 F.B.I. agent were killed and 5 more were wounded sereverly. The F.B.I. agents were totally out gunned by the bank robbers even though they out numbered them 8 to 2, the 2 bank robbers were carrying a Ruger Mini 14 rifle, S&W M3000 shotgun and 2 S&W .357 revolvers. Eventually the two armed robbers were killed but they took some serious lead and kept on going. The F.B.I. chaulked this up to the weapons that the agents were carrying did not have sufficient stopping power.  Hope you enjoyed this little history lesson.

Springfield2

The Springfield XD(M) .40 S&W is a polymer pistol. Polymer is a type of hard plastic that is lighter, resistant to wear, abrasion, solvents, and oils compared to its steel frame brothers. Polymer plastic can be molded into a variety of ergonomic shapes that do not require separate grip panels, permitting them to use high-cap mags without increasing the bulk. It also makes them more adaptable to persons with smaller hands. Another great thing is that the polymer frame flexes under the recoil and also absorbs some of the recoil pulse so they shoot softer then the heavier guns and you can shoot faster while maintaining good grouping.

Now lets move on to the gun features which there are many. The XD(m) is a modified version of the XD which was one of the more popular polymer handguns on the market. Springfield could have been content with the XD and sold them out as fast as they came into the warehouse but they decided they wanted more and boy did they give us more. First off the XD(m) has a match grade barrel which rivals aerospace manufacturing, MG barreling is when the barrel is bored the same thickness with more consistent rifling from the rear of the barrel to the tip, which provides a more accurate shot and better grouping. Match grade is usually an aftermarket part that requires special ordering from a barrel manufacture but Springfield has made this their standard.

Springfield has invented terms for the XD(m) that all start with the letter “M”. Lets explore these features and the clever terms that Springfield as invented. First the XD(m) Major Grasp slide Serrations which means it has deeper serrations on the slide to make it easier to cock the weapon in harsh weather or if you are like me and have sweaty palms.

New home protection system.

Next we have the Mega Lock Texture which gives the weapon an all terrain look. Springfield claims that this isn’t all about cosmetic looks but it sure doesn’t hurt. The extra texture on the handle helps you keep a tighter grip in extreme weather. The angle and depth of each contour has been calculated for maximum control vertically, horizontally, and torsionally, it also asists with long rapid fire strings which once agains assists in grouping. The angle of the handle is very similar to that of the legendary 1911. Like I stated previously the polymer guns have a Model Contour Frame which contours to your hand and makes it feel like the gun is gripping you not you gripping the gun. The gun also comes with 3 different backstrapes that they call Mold-Tru backstrapes. These backstrapes add another layer of comfort to the shooter by conforming to the size of his/her hand. It comes with a small, medium and large size so everyone should be able to find a comfortable grip. Along with the Mold-Tru Backstrapes it comes with Magazine X-Tensions which also assist in making it more comfortable.

One thing that sets Springfield XD(m) apart from other polymer guns on the market is that they use a Melonite finish which is a lot thicker then most finishes used on its competitors. The Melonite finish is a salt bath nitriding process that leaves a thicker, harder and more corrosion resistence finish on the slide.

The XD(m) has a Minimal Reset Trigger which gives it the shortest travel of any polymer gun on the market. The single action trigger is very clean and breaks between 5.5 and 7.7 lbs. The XD(m) also has the shortest reset on the market as well which keeps you on target with a greater ease for faster more accurate follow up shots which once again aides in grouping. The XD(m) has a Picatinny rail system that they call Multi-Adjust Rail System. This allows you to personalize your gun by adding a laser, flashlight system, or even new sights.

The XD(m) comes with a ton of safety features to help the shooter/carry protect himself and the people around him from an accidently discharge. On the slide there are two indicators that tell you the gun is loaded and cocked, first there is an indicator on the slide by the discharge chamber that will protrude from the top to let you know visually and by touch that there is a bullet in the chamber ready to fire. Second there is a pin that protrudes from the back of the slide letting you know that the chamber has been cocked and ready to fire. This pin will protrude even if there is no bullet in the chamber. Some of the other safety features are the Grip Safety which is on the back of the handle and has to be depressed to fire the weapon. Last but defiantly not least is the USA Trigger System. The USA Trigger System stands for Ultra Safety Assurance which guards against accidental discharge from dropping or bumping by locking the trigger in place until direct rearward pressure is applied. Thats four different safety features all on one gun to protect you against accidental discharge. One more thing Springfield has changed about the XD(m) is that you do not have to pull the trigger to field strip the weapon. Talk about field stripping the weapon, the XD(m) only takes seconds to field strip and put back together. With only 5 different parts anyone can field strip the weapon and clean it, which is great for novice shooters or people who are not looking for a complicated home defense system. Springfield is defiantly leading the field in safety which makes them one of the top weapon distributors in my opinion. They have the shooters safety in mind not just their bottom dollar.

Last but not least the Springfield XD(m) comes is a very nice hard plastic carry case that comes with everything you need to use the weapon immediately and it makes a great range case. The case comes with styrofoam cut out for your gun, two magazines(one compact that holds 12 rounds and another extended version that holds 16 rounds), a hard plastic gun holster, a hard plastic magazine holster that holds two fully loaded magazines, a speed loader, three back straps, a gun chain lock, and last but not least cleaning supplies to keep your gun at its best.

Springfield1

In conclusion I think this gun is a no brainer for any level shooter, from beginner to advanced. When I bought this gun I had never owned any type of weapon before. This was my first gun and I am glad that I went with it, I have put over 2,000 rounds thru it without a single jam or malfunction which is a great indicator of the quality of this handgun. The safety features were one of the main reasons I purchased the gun, also the ergonomics of the gun felt like an extension of my arm where as the Glock and other guns didn’t feel as natural when I would point them down range. Also the increased grip texture helped make the gun look pretty badass. I was also looking for a gun with a little more stopping power then a 9mm, but to my surprise I learned that the XD(m) .40S&W is one of the only guns on the market that you can switch to a 9mm with only a few changes. All you have to do is buy a 9mm barrel and some 9mm magazines and switch them out with the .40S&W barrel and the .40S&W magazines and magically you have a 9mm pistol. Two in one, who would have thought. One of the nice things about that is the 9mm bullets are a lot cheaper to purchase then the .40S&W so it helps save money when you just want to go to the range and enjoy blowing the shit out of a target, it also is great if you are sharing this weapon with your spouse because the 9mm round has less recoil and is easier to shoot for women. I would recommend this gun to everyone, from a women just looking for a small concealable gun for self-defense, a husband who is looking for a home defense weapon to protect his family, to a Police Officer looking for a secondary or primary weapon for duty. The XD(m) comes in pretty much every size and caliber that you could possibly want. In this review we focused on the 3.8 Compact .40S&W but they are all exactly the same but for caliber size and barrel length. They come in 3.8″ barrel with full handle and compact handle, and shoot .45ACP, .40S&W, 9mm rounds, its also comes in 4.5″ barrel that shoots .45ACP, .40S&W, 9mm, and last but not least it comes in 5.25″ barrel that shoots .45ACP, .40S&W, and 9mm rounds. What else could you possible want/need in a polymer handgun. I know this was a long blog but I do love this gun and there is a lot to know before you make such an important purchase. I hope this blog will help you make your desicion on if this is the right weapon for you.

Thank you for reading and keep an eye out for my next post. My next post I will be reviewing Smiths SK2 2-Stone sharpening kit. Also please leave a review/comment in the section below.