Survival Tips – First Aid Part IV

Welcome back to First Aid Part IV. This is the last part of the first aid survival tips. So make sure to pay attention. Remember that this tips are to be used only in an emergency situation and you should always call 911 first if you are near a hospital. Alright lets see what kind of tips I have in store for you tonight.
Poison

  1. Poisoning – Symptoms: Nausea, vomitting, diarrhea, sweating, breathing difficulties. You will experience chest or abdominal pain. You could also have seizures, headaches, dizziness, weakness, irregularpupil size. Your eyes might burn or tear up. You may experience burns on your lips, tongue, skin. You could have abnormal skin color, especially ashen or pale. Possible Condition: Poison ingested, inhaled, absorbed, or injected into your body. For example: snakes, spiders, jelly fish, etc. Course of Action: First you will want to remove the victim from the scene of the poisoning. Check the victim for life threatening conditions and treat the symptoms. If the victim has been poisoned from contact directly to the skin then wash the area with lots of water. Next you will want to apply baking soda or calamine lotion to dry up sores from poison on skin. If the victim ingested the poison then give them lots and lots of water. If the poison that was ingested is non-corosive then induce vomitting to expel from body then give them lots of water( do not induce vomitting if the poison is corrosive because it will damage the throat and stomach lining coming back up). If poison is corrosive (acid or alkaline) do not induce vomitting. Give victim water and then a mild acid or alkaline to neutralize the poison.
    rash

  2. Rashes – Symtoms: You will experience weeping, scaling, inflamed skin. Possible Condition: Skin will have rashes that are caused by infection or dirt clogging pores. Course of Action: You will want to treat the rash like you would an open wound-keep it clean and cover it with sterile bandages. If the rash is most it keep dry, if rash is dry then keep it moist. Make sure the apply antiseptics. Absolutely do not scratch the rash, it will only make it worse.
    seizure
  3. Seizures – Symptoms: Seizures will cause you to have blank stare on yours/the victims face. It will cause disorientation. You will also experience convulsions(uncontrolled muscle movements). Possible Condition: Reaction to extreme heat. It could also be caused by a diabetic reaction. They can also be cause by a traumatic injury to the brain. Course of Action: Absolutely do not try to hold the victim down this may cause injury to you or the victim. Absolutely do not put anything in the victim mouth, the victim may bite down and injury you or himself/herself worse. One thing that you can do to assist the victim is to support the head by using a pillow or a folded up piece of cloth(such as sweatshirt, blanket). If the victims mouth fills with any kind of fluid such as blood, saliva, or vomit, roll the victim on to his/her side to let the liquid drain. Once the seizure has subsided check the victim for breathing and injuries cause by convulsions also assure them that everything is ok and that help is on the way. You might also want to tell them where they are and that they are safe and that you are there to help them.
    shock
  4. Shock – Symptoms: You will become irritably, experience restlessness, nausea, vomitting, and excessive thirst. You may also experience an altered state of consciousness. You will also have a rapid breathing and pulse. You may also have skin that is cool, moist, pale, and ashen. Possible Condition: The flow of your blood is inadequate for body’s major organs and tissue (shock). Course of Action: Have the victim lay flat on their back and make sure they are as comfortable as possible. It is also a good idea to elevate the victims feet about 12 inches. It is important to keep the victims skin from getting too warm or cold. You will want to monitors the victims breathing and pulse. Do not give food or water if immediate hospitalization is an option. If hospitalization is not an option make sure to give the victim warm liquids to drink.
    snakebite
  5. Snakebite – Symptoms: You will have extreme pain around the bite marks in the victims skin. The victim will also experience swelling and strong pain around the bite(Pit Vipers). You may also have an allergic reaction. Some more reactions are blurring of vision, loss of reflexes, slurring of speech, nausea, and difficulty breathing(coral snakes). Condition: The venom of a snake bite has been injected into the bloodstream. Course of Action: To treat pit vipers, rattlesnakes, copperheads, or cottonmouths wash the wound; make sure to keep the bite site low and still and below your heart. For coral snakes, the treatment is similar as above but apply an elastic band starting farthest from the heart and rolling it around the wound. You will also want to keep the bite site still and lower then the heart. Make sure to keep the victim calm as possible to keep heart rate low. Absolutely do not apply ice to bite sites, you will want to cut the wound, and apply a tourniquet or apply suction.
    sprains
  6. Sprains – Symptoms: The sprained body part will swell and start bruising. You will also experience severe pain in the ankle, knee, wrist, and fingers. You will not be able to use the injured area normally, and you will experience weakness in that body part. Possible Condition: Tearing of ligament at joint. Course of Action: For mild sprains you will want to apply ice and elevate. You will also want to get lots of rest. You can also take a Tylenol regiment if not allergic, this will help control the swelling and help with the pain. For severe sprains treat as you would for broken bones.You will want to immobilize the body part as it was found. Do not apply a splint unless you need to move the victim, if you need to move the victim then you can apply a splint by attaching two pieces of wood/board on either side of the area and then wrap with tape or ace bandage. You will want to elevate and apply ice, unless elevating increases the pain.

Thanks for reading the last blog post on First Aid, I hope that over the course of the last 4 posts you have learned something new. I had a great time researching and explaining how to treat injuries, it is something that I have been interested in since I was young. I always wanted to become a sports therapist/physical therapist or sports trainer. I did some volunteer hours with my schools sports trainer and I had a blast helping the athletes when they were injured or wrapping the wrists and ankles with sports tapes to prevent injury. I enjoyed running out on to the field and assessing the situation on the fly and coming to a conclusion and applying my knowledge on how to fix the injury. If you have any questions or comments please leave them below. Also don’t forget to click the button at the bottom of the screen to follow my blog so you don’t miss out on new posts. Thank You!!!!

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Survival Tips – First Aid Part III

Hey Y’all, 

Welcome to Part III of emergency first aid. Remember that these are tips if you are in an emergency and do not have access to a hospital. You should always take anyone who is hurt to a hospital if you have that option available and remember to always call 911, do not hesitate because a few seconds could be the difference between life and death or coherent or vegetable. All right lets jump right in and get out boots muddy.

  1. thermal burn
    Electrical Injuries – Symptoms: Thermal burns, usually there will be a entry wound and an exit wound with lightening. The patient will most likely go into shock, they will experience breathing difficulties and cessations or could possibly have no pulse. Possible Condition:  Electrical burns. Electric shock. Course of Action: Do not approach the victim until you know for sure that the victim does not have electricity still running through his body. Immediately cover the wounds with sterile, dry dressings and bandages. Treat victim for shock and administer CPR if needed.
    frostbite
  2. Frostbite – Symptoms: The part of the body that is frostbitten will have a loss of sensation. The skin will appear waxy. It will also be cold and white, yellow, blue or flushed. Possible Condition: Parts of your body have been exposed to extremely low temperatures for an extended period of time. Course of Action: Remove any accessories from the area that has been exposed and is frostbitten. Immediately soak the affected area in a warm bath (make sure the water is no more then 105 degrees F) until color and warmth returns. Dress frostbitten area with sterile dressings and bandages. If your hands and feet are frostbitten place the gauze between the toes and fingers. A tip to help warm up the hands is to place them under your armpits; and if possible place your frostbitten feet on another persons stomach. It is very important to remember absolutely DO NOT RUB FROSTBITTEN SKIN.
    fungal infection
  3. Fungal Infections – Symptoms: The skin that is infected especially the feet and groin will be covered with irritating rash, blisters, swelling, itching, and scales. Possible Condition: Fungal Infection growing on body. Course of Action: Make sure to keep the infected area clean and dry at all times. A great cure for a fungal infection is to expose the infected area to sunlight as much as possible. Also make sure not to scratch the area. Another form of treatment is ointments, and powders.
    heat stroke
  4. Heat-Related Illnesses – Symptoms: You will experience cramps, dizziness, weakness, nausea, pale skin, you will be flushed, your skill will be moist and cool, or ashen. You will also experience a rapid but weak pulse. Possible Condition: If the victim is experiencing cramps get them to a cool area, give them cool water to drink; and massage and stretch affected muscles. If the victim is experiencing heat exhaustion then move them to a cool place as well; make sure to loosen the clothing so its not touching their skin. Then apply wet towels directly to the skin, fan victims body; give cool water to drink. For heat stroke, follow the same steps for heat exhaustion. Make sure to make them rest on their side; absolutely do not let the victim to continue their normal activities for rest of the day and then have them re-evaluate them the next day before allowing to return to any physical activities. 
    hypothermia
  5. Hypothermia – Symptoms: The victim will have a glassy stare, they will shiver, and experience numbness. They also may become unconscious. Possible Condition: The victims entire body’s temperature will loss heat and drop below safe temp levels. Course of Action: First and foremost remove any wet clothing from the victims body and get them dry ASAP. You will want to gradually warm the victim by adding layers gradually. Once they have reached a safe temp put them in warm, dry clothing and have them move to a warm, dry place. Once you have moved them to a warm environment give them warm liquids but make sure they do not contain any alcohol or caffeine. Usually most people think of tea but make sure its a non caffeinated tea. The reason i keep saying gradually is cause you do not want to warm the victim to quickly or submerse them in a warm bath because it could cause heart problems.
    insect bite
  6. Insect and Scorpion Stings – Symptoms: There will be extreme pain in effected area. The victim also might have an allergic reaction. They also may have excessive salivating from the mouth this will be associated with the venom from spider and scorpions bites/stings. Possible Condition: This may be caused by bee stings, spider bites, scorpion stings, etc. Course of Action: If the victim has been stung then first you will want to remove the stinger with either tweezers, your fingernails, or you can run a credit card over your skin. Wash the area with warm water and soap. Cover with a bandage and keep it clean, then apply ice to reduce swelling. After the sting immediately check for anaphylactic shock. If the victim is stung by a scorpion or bit by a spider, wash the wound and apply an ice pack. If available and victim needs it give them antivenin.

I hope you learned some new first aid tips reading this post. Remember that only use these tips if you are in an emergency situation and can not access a hospital. Always call 911 or take the victim to an emergency room if that option is available. Please leave any comments or questions below, also don’t forget to click on the button at the bottom of the screen to follow my blog and stay up to date on all new posts. Thank you and hope to have you back soon.

What to Pack in a First Aid Kit

Hi NWTactical Readers,

I’m going to be covering what the American Red Cross recommends for First Aid Kits. This post is different then the previous one I posted called Bug-out Bag. A bug-out bag is incase of Natural Disasters and economic emergencies, this kit is what you should carry just on a typical hike or camping trip and in your home and car. Lets get started with what you should have in a first aid kit. 

The American Red Cross recommends that you always carry a first aid kit. They say you should keep one in your house, and your car. Also if you are going camping, hiking, or even backpacking.

  • Absorbent Compress Dressings, 5×9 inches
  • 25 Assorted Adhesive Bandages
  • 10 Yards of Adhesive Cloth Tape
  • 5 Packets of Antibiotic Ointment
  • 5 Packets of Antiseptic Wipes
  • Space Blanket
  • Breathing Barrier, w/ One-Way Valve
  • Instant Cold Compress
  • 2 Pairs Gloves, Non-Latex. The reason you want non-latex is because a lot of people are allergic and you don’t want to make that situation worse by causing an allergic reaction
  • 2 Packets of Hydrocortisone Ointment
  • Scissors
  • 1 Roller Bandage (elastic band), 3 inches wide
  • 1 Roller Bandage (elastic band), 4 inches wide
  • 5 Sterile Gauze Pads, 3×3 inches
  • 5 Sterile Gauze Pads, 4×4 inches
  • Oral Thermometer (no glass or mercury)
  • 2 Triangle Bandages
  • Tweezers
  • Instruction Booklet for Administering First Aid

This might seem like a lot of items but it is the minimum you should carry and it will surprise you how small of a box/bag it will fit in. Remember you should keep on in your home and every car you own, also carry one on a camping trip, hiking, or backpacking trip. Also go through the kit with your family and make sure your children understand all the items in the box. It also wouldn’t hurt to give them a short crash course on how to administer a bandage and oitment. It will go a long ways in making them more confident and comfortable using the kit,. especially if something happens and you are not there to assist them or something happens to you. THank you for reading and I hope you learned something new and I really hope that you will make one of these kits. Please leave any comment or questions below. Also don’t forget to click on the follow button at the bottom of the screen so you don’t miss out on any new posts.

 

Survival Tips – First Aid Part II

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What’s up Y’all?

Welcome back, we will be continuing talking about how to treat minor injuries if you are stuck far from a hospital. Please remember that this is something you should only do if you cannot access an emergency room. Alright lets dive right in.

  1. Boils – Symptoms: Red, tender spot on skin. Soft, pus-filled center forms amid tender area. Possible Condition: Skin abscess-deep, localized infection. Course of Action: Soak boils in warm water or apply heat packs to increase circulation and improve body’s ability to fight infection. Do not attempt to drain boil until it forms a “head” or pustule. If large boil forms, lance it with a sterile needle or knife and drain pus. Cover w/ sterile gauze and bandage.
  2. Breathing Difficulties – Symptoms: Slow or rapid breathing. Gasping, clinching the throat with one or two hands. Deep or shallow breathing. Gurgling, wheezing, dizziness. Unusually cool or moist skin. Possible Condition: It could be asthma, and/or bronchitis. Hyperventilation, often caused by anxiety, head injury, or severe bleeding. Allergic reaction. Foreign object in air-way. Course of Action: Switch person’s position; lying on side w/ upper leg bent or sitting may improve breathing. To treat blocked airway(choking), give blows to the back; wrap your arms around victim’s abdomen from behind, place fist just above naval, grab fist w/ other hand and make fast, upward thrusts into abs. If you find yourself alone and choking you can use an object around you like a chair or if nothing is around you that will work try using your fists like you would on someone else. If victim in unconscious and not breathing, place victim on back, push down on forehead while pulling up on bony part of jaw to lift the chin. This “head-tilt chin-lift technique” moves the tongue so air can reach the lungs. Check victims. If still not breathing, give two rescue breathes with each breath lasting one second. Pinch nose shut; take a breath and make a complete seal over victim’s mouth; blow in to make chest rise. Check to see if breaths go in; check for pulse by feeling at side of windpipe. If breaths do not go in, clear airway. If victim has no pulse and is not breathing begin CPR. If victim has a pulse but is not breathing, give 10 rescue breaths per minute until victim breathes on his own.
  3. Burns – Symptoms: Skin is red, dry, and swelling. In more severe cases, skin has blisters, appears wet or mottled, or skin turns brown or black. Possible Conditions: Thermal burns; radiation burns (sun’s ultraviolet light) Course of Action: Cool burn with lots of cold, running water. Cover with sterile dressing and bandage. In severe cases, take steps to minimize shock. Do not let victim get too hot or cold. Do not apply ice except if the burn is small, and then for only 10 minutes. Do not attempt to clean or apply ointment directly on a severe burn.
  4. Cuts and Abrasions – Symptoms: removal of outer skin layers. Red rash caused by scraping. Bleeding from opening in skin caused by sharp object. Possible Condition: Abrasion, laceration, puncture wound, or avulsion (tearing/ removal of skin and soft tissue). Course of Action: Clean abrasions w/ soap and water to prevent infection. Care for open wounds w/ dressings and bandages.
  5. Dehydration – Symptoms: Thrist. Dizziness. Dry mouth and nasal passages. Infrequent urination; urine is dark. Weakness/fatigue. Headache. Confusion, irritability, slurring of speech. Possible Condition: Body has lost too much water to function properly. Course of Action: Drink small amounts of water at frequent intervals. Keep clothes on; clothing barrier decreases water loss through sweating. Sugar or oral rehydration salts may be added to first water given to victim. Victim should refrain from physical activity while recovering. If victim must move, take frequent breaks for rest and water.
  6. Drowning – Symptoms: Submerged victim does not breathe and/or has no pulse after being pulled from water. Possible Condition: Water in lungs (drowning, partial drowning) Course of Action: Clear airway and follow guidelines under “breathing difficulties.” Prepare to administer CPR.

I hope this comes in handy when you really need it. I also hope you learned something new as well. Remember that you should only use these skills when you are in an emergency. You should always take the injured person to an emergency room if you have access to one.

Thank you again for reading my blog post on First Aid. Please leave a comment and also don’t forget to click on the button at the bottom to become a follower.