Survival Tips – Edible Plants Part IV

Howdy Partners,

Sorry its been so long since my last post. Life has been hectic, but I’m back and in full force. Today we are gonna cover some more edible plants. I really enjoy this topic cause I love learning about the outdoors and some of the plants you would never in a million years think you could eat and that they would sustain life. So lets jump right in.
Manioc Root
Manioc Tree

  1. Manioc (Cassava): Perennial shrub. The Manioc gros up to three to nine feet tall. It has fingerlike leaves radiating from central, jointed stem. You can find the Cassava in all moist, tropical areas. The Manioc roots need to be ground into pulp. Then cook them for one hour to remove poison from the roots. Once the pulp is cooked thoroughly shape the remaining pulp into cakes for baking. You can also mix in some flour into the cakes before you cook them and they will last a really long time as long as they are shielded from insects. Remember that the roots must be cooked, they are extremely LETHAL if ate RAW.
    Maple
  2. Maple: Common tree in scores of species. Leaves have three distinctive lobes; the maple fruits have two lobes and flutter as they fall. The Maple grows throughout temperate forests. You can eat the Maples young leaves and seeds. To get the sweet sweet nectar that everyone loves so much all you need to do is cut a V-shaped notch in the tree trunk and then collect the sap or what we say Maple Syrup YUM YUM! You can also chew the leaves and seeds; or eat the bark.
    Marsh Marigold
  3. Marsh Marigold: Flowering water plant. The Marsh Marigold has beautiful round, dark green leaves, five-petaled yellow flowers. You can find them in temperate zones to arctic; bogs, streams, and lakes. You can eat every part of the Marsh Marigold but it must be cooked first. You want to bring water to strong boil and then cook in the water until tender.
    Mountain Ash
  4. Mountain Ash: Small tree with orange or red fruits. The Mountain Ash has clusters of white flowers three to five inches apart. The Mountain Ash has smooth grey bark and it grows in woody and rocky places in temperate zones. The Mountain Ash has berries that are edible, you will want to boil the berries to reduce the sharp taste.
    Mulberries
  5. Mulberries: Small to medium tree. The Mulberry looks like large blackberries, with leaves that are deeply lobed and serrated. The Mulberry tree grows in forests and fields of northern and southern temperate and tropical zones. Berries are heavily seeded but very juicy. You can eat the berries raw, cooked, or dried. Try making jam, yum yum.
    Nipa Palm
  6. Nipa Palm: Broad, short palm. The Nipa Palm is a little different then most tree’s the trunk of the Nipa mostly grows underground.  The leaves shoot up from the trunk and can be as large as 20 feet tall, is that not out there or what? The Nipa Palm grows in the mud of east Asian shorelines. What you want to do is cut the stalks of the leaves and drink the sugary liquid juice that comes out. You can also eat the seeds but they are kinda hard. Another great use for this tree other then eating is to use the leaves to thatch a roof, since they are so large and sturdy. 
    Papaw
  7. Papaw: Shrub or small tree with brownish-gray bark. The Papaw has white, six petaled flowers. The fruits are two to six inches long. The largest ones are indigenous to North America. It grows in temperate forests; northern variety is deciduous while southern is evergreen. You will want to eat the fruit raw because it is high in protein. 

Thank you for joining me today in learning about some more plants that are edible. Remember that these are last resort and should not be ate in large quantities. I hope you learned something new today. Also make sure to get out and enjoy this beautiful country that we have at our fingertips. Just remember to make sure to bring the proper supplies.

Please let comments and questions below. Also don’t forget to click on the “follow” button so you stay up to date on all nw tactical posts.

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