Survival Tips – First Aid Part II

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What’s up Y’all?

Welcome back, we will be continuing talking about how to treat minor injuries if you are stuck far from a hospital. Please remember that this is something you should only do if you cannot access an emergency room. Alright lets dive right in.

  1. Boils – Symptoms: Red, tender spot on skin. Soft, pus-filled center forms amid tender area. Possible Condition: Skin abscess-deep, localized infection. Course of Action: Soak boils in warm water or apply heat packs to increase circulation and improve body’s ability to fight infection. Do not attempt to drain boil until it forms a “head” or pustule. If large boil forms, lance it with a sterile needle or knife and drain pus. Cover w/ sterile gauze and bandage.
  2. Breathing Difficulties – Symptoms: Slow or rapid breathing. Gasping, clinching the throat with one or two hands. Deep or shallow breathing. Gurgling, wheezing, dizziness. Unusually cool or moist skin. Possible Condition: It could be asthma, and/or bronchitis. Hyperventilation, often caused by anxiety, head injury, or severe bleeding. Allergic reaction. Foreign object in air-way. Course of Action: Switch person’s position; lying on side w/ upper leg bent or sitting may improve breathing. To treat blocked airway(choking), give blows to the back; wrap your arms around victim’s abdomen from behind, place fist just above naval, grab fist w/ other hand and make fast, upward thrusts into abs. If you find yourself alone and choking you can use an object around you like a chair or if nothing is around you that will work try using your fists like you would on someone else. If victim in unconscious and not breathing, place victim on back, push down on forehead while pulling up on bony part of jaw to lift the chin. This “head-tilt chin-lift technique” moves the tongue so air can reach the lungs. Check victims. If still not breathing, give two rescue breathes with each breath lasting one second. Pinch nose shut; take a breath and make a complete seal over victim’s mouth; blow in to make chest rise. Check to see if breaths go in; check for pulse by feeling at side of windpipe. If breaths do not go in, clear airway. If victim has no pulse and is not breathing begin CPR. If victim has a pulse but is not breathing, give 10 rescue breaths per minute until victim breathes on his own.
  3. Burns – Symptoms: Skin is red, dry, and swelling. In more severe cases, skin has blisters, appears wet or mottled, or skin turns brown or black. Possible Conditions: Thermal burns; radiation burns (sun’s ultraviolet light) Course of Action: Cool burn with lots of cold, running water. Cover with sterile dressing and bandage. In severe cases, take steps to minimize shock. Do not let victim get too hot or cold. Do not apply ice except if the burn is small, and then for only 10 minutes. Do not attempt to clean or apply ointment directly on a severe burn.
  4. Cuts and Abrasions – Symptoms: removal of outer skin layers. Red rash caused by scraping. Bleeding from opening in skin caused by sharp object. Possible Condition: Abrasion, laceration, puncture wound, or avulsion (tearing/ removal of skin and soft tissue). Course of Action: Clean abrasions w/ soap and water to prevent infection. Care for open wounds w/ dressings and bandages.
  5. Dehydration – Symptoms: Thrist. Dizziness. Dry mouth and nasal passages. Infrequent urination; urine is dark. Weakness/fatigue. Headache. Confusion, irritability, slurring of speech. Possible Condition: Body has lost too much water to function properly. Course of Action: Drink small amounts of water at frequent intervals. Keep clothes on; clothing barrier decreases water loss through sweating. Sugar or oral rehydration salts may be added to first water given to victim. Victim should refrain from physical activity while recovering. If victim must move, take frequent breaks for rest and water.
  6. Drowning – Symptoms: Submerged victim does not breathe and/or has no pulse after being pulled from water. Possible Condition: Water in lungs (drowning, partial drowning) Course of Action: Clear airway and follow guidelines under “breathing difficulties.” Prepare to administer CPR.

I hope this comes in handy when you really need it. I also hope you learned something new as well. Remember that you should only use these skills when you are in an emergency. You should always take the injured person to an emergency room if you have access to one.

Thank you again for reading my blog post on First Aid. Please leave a comment and also don’t forget to click on the button at the bottom to become a follower.

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